Texas Real Estate Broker Jenna Ryan Pleads Guilty in Capitol Riot Case

Capitol Riot

Texas Real Estate Broker Jenna Ryan Pleads Guilty in Capitol Riot Case

Jenna Ryan said in social media posts after the insurrection that “it was one of the best days of my life”

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The Frisco real estate broker who signed a plea deal last summer after being accused of being part of the group that stormed the U.S. Capitol on Jan. 6 and then posted about it on social media is headed to prison.

Ryan was sentenced Thursday to 60 days behind bars and a $1,000 fine along with $500 in restitution to the architect of the Capitol; after pleading guilty in July to “parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building,” she faced up to six months in jail and a fine of up to $5,000.

According to our radio partner KRLD, Ryan will report to prison sometime after the holidays, after Jan. 3, 2022.

According to court documents, the sentencing judge could either follow the recommended punishment outlined in Ryan’s plea deal or decide on something different. Ryan’s sentencing comes a year and a day after the 2020 presidential election.

Jennifer Leigh Ryan, also known as Jenna Ryan, surrendered just days after the insurrection, the Dallas FBI confirmed to NBC 5 in January. She was taken into custody and her home searched by federal investigators.

In the criminal complaint against Ryan, FBI special agent Amie Stemen said Ryan knowingly entered a restricted building where the vice president was present and engaged in disruptive conduct in the Capitol with the intent to disrupt the session of Congress.

Photographs were taken from Capitol surveillance included in the complaint, the FBI said, and showed Ryan at the doorway of and inside the restricted building.

Stemen added Ryan posted on social media before entering the building that “We’re gonna go down and storm the capitol” and the next day added that, “It was one of the best days of my life.”

The FBI said Ryan traveled to Washington, D.C. with Jason Hyland and Katherine Schwab and that the three were recorded on video entering the Capitol together through the Rotunda door. While inside the Capitol, federal investigators said Ryan was chanting with the crowd “Fight for Trump!” as Capitol alarms can be heard going off.

Investigators said while Ryan was inside the Rotunda she took several videos and photos and later posted on her Twitter account that “Today was a great example of what America is all about.”

Jenna Ryan

Jenna Ryan, the Texas real estate agent who was arrested by the FBI on accusations of disorderly conduct and trespassing during the Capitol riot, spoke out to NBC’s Cynthia McFadden before her arrest. She says she took no part in the violence and condemns it, though some of her social media posts raise questions.

In interviews after the Capitol riot, Ryan told NBC’s Cynthia McFadden she had no regrets about participating in the incursion and believed she committed no crimes. McFadden’s interview aired on Today in January before President Trump left office. In the interview, Ryan pleaded with him to give her a pardon.

“President Trump I want you to know that I have been a true supporter of yours and I believe that you won the election. I believe in America and I believe in your values. And I was not a violent protestor and I would ask that you would pardon me from this misdemeanor.”

Trump did not pardon anyone related to the riot prior to leaving office.

According to court documents, Hyland was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. Court documents show Hyland was arraigned and pleaded not guilty to counts 1-4 on March 9. Hyland is free on a personal recognizance bond.

According to court documents, Schwab was charged with entering and remaining in a restricted building; disorderly and disruptive conduct in a restricted building; violent entry and disorderly conduct in a Capitol building; parading, demonstrating, or picketing in a Capitol building. Court documents show Schwab was arraigned and pleaded not guilty to all counts on July 15. Schwab is free on a personal recognizance bond.

Hearing dates for Hyland and Schwab have not yet been confirmed.