The Kakhovka Dam Collapse Is an Ecological Disaster

A push notification news alert on his phone, then images of the deluge—that’s how Heorhiy Veremiychyk learned of the disaster. With water pouring through the stricken Kakhovka Dam in the Kherson region of Ukraine, he immediately understood the enormity of what had happened. “The water raised very sharply,” he says, referring to the terrible effects…

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The 25 Best Shows on Hulu Right Now

Netflix may have led the way for other streaming networks to create compelling original programming, but the best shows on Hulu are history-making. In 2017, it became the first streamer to win an Emmy Award for Outstanding Drama Series for The Handmaid’s Tale. In fact, that was just one of eight Emmys the series took home…

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Marc Andreessen Is (Mostly) Wrong This Time

Marc Andreessen occasionally sets the world on its ear with a sweeping hypothesis about the dawn of a new technological era. In his legendary 2011 blog post “Why Software Is Eating the World,” the cofounder of Andreessen Horowitz made the then-novel, now-undeniable case that even the most old-school industrial companies would soon have to put…

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A Leaked Tesla Report Shows the Cybertruck Had Basic Design Flaws

In November 2019, Tesla CEO Elon Musk stepped onto a stage in California to launch a new kind of EV: the Cybertruck, an angular cyberpunk-styled pickup with bodywork made of brushed stainless steel and “unbreakable” glass. What happened next has entered into public relations folklore. Under the glare of the cameras, the demo truck’s windows smashed…

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To Make a Greener Building, Start With an Old One

Next time you find yourself in a new-ish US office building, scan the walls visible from the entryway. Within seconds, you are almost guaranteed to find a glittering circular plaque embossed with a leaf. It’ll be topped with the words LEED Platinum—or sometimes Gold, Silver, or just Certified. In the late ’90s and early 2000s,…

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Ocean Currents Are Slowing, With Potentially Devastating Effects

In the crushing, cold depths of the oceans, something unimaginably huge flows inexorably, barely a few centimeters per second, along a path it has traveled for millennia. Dense, dark rivers of water toil ceaselessly around the world, making up around 40 percent of the total volume of the deep oceans. They are gigantic conveyor belts…

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The Bizarre Reality of Getting Online in North Korea

For 25 million North Koreans, the internet is an impossibility. Only a few thousand privileged members of the hermit kingdom’s society can access the global internet, while even the country’s heavily censored internal intranet is out of reach for the majority of the population. Getting access to free and open information isn’t an option. New…

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Spoutible's Low-Budget, Audacious Quest to Be the Next Twitter

Looking back, I believe I can pinpoint the exact day I loved Twitter most: May 24, 2011. I was in a small Oregon town for work, coping with loneliness and stress in a shabby motel. With a 22-ounce bottle of high-proof beer, I whiled away the evening by churning out a random assortment of tweets:…

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India’s Tech Obsession May Leave Millions of Workers Without Pay

Vaishali Kanal’s wages don’t depend on how much she works. They depend on whether there is internet in her village or not. Kanal, 25, usually leaves her toddler at home in Palatpada, a remote village in western India, early in the morning, and goes to work on a nearby building site. But when we met…

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The Trade-Offs for Privacy in a Post-Dobbs Era

Michele Gomez remembers the exact moment when she realized the problem. It was the fall of 2022. Gomez (who, like me, is a family physician and abortion provider in California) had recently provided a virtual medication abortion to a patient from Texas. The patient had flown to her mom’s house in California, where she had…

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